Jigsaw24 Apple iPad Conference December 2013

Today I went to Prior Park College in Bath to attend the Jigsaw24 Apple Conference. They do iPads rather than tablets. And have some pretty cool ideas, offer schools excellent support, do great insurance that covers the gap when pupils don’t pay and sell iPad at the lowest cost I have seen. They genuinely seem to be a friendly and effective bunch of people. We have a contract with them, but I am not sure exactly what for as I write – they deal with our ICT Services Department.

It was few in number but interesting. There was no hashtag. These are just my notes lifted from evernote and edited a little. Please forgive the lack of detail in places and haphazard formatting. My thought on the matters arising will come later following an enlightening walk and a coffee with this lovely man I met there (but cannot remember his name; burning moment of shame) and I need to think about it all a bit more.

Source: http://eyedzard.deviantart.com/art/Need-To-Think-Outside-The-Box-202783112 (labelled for re-use on search)

Source: http://eyedzard.deviantart.com/art/Need-To-Think-Outside-The-Box-202783112 (labelled for re-use on search)

Lara Havord

  • Education manager, apple UK (now a team of 6 people – only 6??).
  • iPad can ignite hunger for learning.
  • Apple committed and passionate about education.
  • All about the teaching and learning and the good learning outcomes.
  • Lara ran (still runs??) Regional Training Centres.
  • They are there to provide advice and support to any school that wants it.
  • Close link to schools.
  • Always happy to talk.
  • Use resellers like jigsaw but can contact directly.
  • All about individuals. Learners. Solve problems. Create.
  • Apple Distinguished Educator programme.
  • Research. Looking at impact of tech in schools.
  • Apple.com uk site has evidence on it. (? https://www.apple.com/uk/education/)
  • Hull uni report on research in Scottish schools.
  • And Longfield iPad research report listed by NAACE.
  • ItunesU. Fantastic free resource. Rich store of material created by top educators in the globe.
  • iBooks Author.
  • Referencd SAMR & TPACK.
  • Free apps now include gband and iMovie.
  • But iCloud is the online access winner.
  • Apple TV. AirPlay.
  • Accessibility. Tools and features.
  • Why iPad in education? Lists apps listed above more or less. 95000+ educational apps.
  • But, identify key apps to realise your educational vision.
  • However, education collections exist to help you browse edu apps. iWork stuff.
  • Really about what you do with them and who supports you. RTCs. Apple Professional Development ADP. Resellers.
  • Encouraged to make the most of our apple technology. Get fee training from RTC. Consider ADP.
  • It is all about excellent teaching and learning.

Film. Apple promo for education. ContacT: havord.lara@apple.com

Mike and Paul

  • Flagship trainers. ADEs.
  • Certified APD specialists.Importance of vision and plan course in the apple catalogue.
  • SLT course.
  • Looking for transformational activities going on in case studies? In the evidence?
  • The course looks at how we are going to reach goals, what the goals are and how we might adapt existing plans.
  • Planning how to present those ideas to key stakeholders. Staff. Governors. Parents.

The plan:

  • The goal/aim is the third stage. Recommend 1-2-1 deployment. Evidence supports this.First stage. Where to start. (Class sets, cited as the most difficult way to use iPads in school – oh dear). Often felt to be deemed successful mainly because of novelty shiny value – everyone’s excited. There will be struggle. Mike and Paul are here to support us.The second stage can be hard. Difficult second album analogy overused.Discussion points:
  • Deployment model. Nigel (teacher presenting later) has done this. Splitting them into smaller groups might be better.
  • Technical support demands for class sets that aren’t there for 1-2-1.
  • Esafety.
  • Digital leaders. Staff – cascade existing skills. Largely experiential collaborative learning process. Access on personal basis and in school preferably before using in school.
  • Apps. Paid? Which ones and why? Training plan targeting specific departments and apps.
  • Road ahead vision. Strategy. Tablets around for a while. We can/should plan their use.

Paul

  • Course provides opportunities to get hands on devices.
  • ItunesU. Looks like nice content for classics dept on there.
  • Also interesting resources on iPad in classroom. Subscribed to a couple.

Sarah Paddock. Teacher.

  • On twitter.
  • From prior Park Prep school. Trial for two months. 1-2-1.
  • Made sure infrastructure was good allowing movement between rooms etc.
  • Meraki with MDMA and light speed through jigsaw.
  • VPP.
  • Card free apple IDs for pupils and staff.
  • Apps made via requests.
  • Student workflow solution achieved via google apps.
  • Padagogy wheel mapped to blooms.
  • Pupil, teacher and parent surveys before and after trial.
  • Parent and pupil meeting before and after.
  • Updates throughout the trial.
  • Staff twilight training once a week. Including troubleshooting.
  • Pupil digital leaders meet once a week.

Ian Barker. Latin teacher

  • On twitter.
  • Socrative. Loves it for vocab testing.Digital leaders presenting. Helps with dyslexia because of changing text size. Mind maps like popplet. Apps: book creator. Send to iBooks. Showed his books. Signed contract beforehand. No games 12+. Teacher can look at iPad any time. Pic collage. Next DL. Y7. 2 month trial. Very happy at first. Teaching same material in a different way. Socrative again. Latin. Maths.Explain everything in art. Book creator. Complete topics quicker. Own pace. Prep fun.
  • The trial has been more successful than they had hoped. Jigsaw were a great support. Buying iPads for all staff in Jan 2014. And then think about pupils for next academic year.
  • Questions about Google Drive.sharing folders for each class with subjects in them. Student shares work with teacher which triggers email and prompts marking.Showbie for sharing. Edmodo do as well. Or paid for solutions that give access to network drives on iPads.

Notes from lunch

  • BYOD issues because range of devices meant that intimidation for teachers. Not knowing how to get things going/working. Not same apps etc.
  • Casper MDM. Great means of authentication. Meraki free but bought by Cisco for cloud security tools. MDM might not be sustained.
  • Parental purchase. Parents expect usage of device.
  • iOS7 seems to create issues with lag when streaming video. Jigsaw said this had never happened on previous OS.
  • Also an issue with Apple TVs requiring schools to group these dynamically via Bonjour so you only see those in immediate vicinity.

Lightspeed Systems

  • Est. 1999. In Europe since 2005. Protecting over one million students in UK.
  • Work with all the big players from technical side.
  • Three solutions make up mobile learning essentials…
  • Manage devices
  • Keep safe on internet on school owned devices at home
  • Collaborate with MyBigCampus

Selling points:

  • Commitment to education
  • Educational rich features
  • Comprehensive reporting
  • Focus on mobility, 1:1 or class sets
  • Easy admin, delegate admin down to classroom level.

Mobile device management:

  • Hierarchical design. Delegate admin to teachers in classroom to open or close access to resources, e.g. Turn off cameras.

My Big Campus

  • Learning platform. VLE but new generation.
  • Social networking approach. shared storage. Device apps for access. Public resources, once used on MBC, is categorised and made available through their search engine. Build community of users. Teachers can communicate on EduTalk feature. Linked with web filtering solution so that web access used on site applies. Teacher uses a resource and it’s auto unblocked on school network. Filter works at home as well. Policies granular. Redirects YouTube and Google to education versions. Strict safe search enforced, images blocked are blocked on websites as well. Lockouts for repeat offenders. Email notifications triggered. Overrides is a soft block e.g. Nudity in art will auto trigger reauthentication. Web zones controls what students do on internet in your classroom. White and black list sites possible.
  • Video. Samuel Lister Academy. On youtube.

Paul and Mike again

  • Accessibility features on iPad. Lots of great things for Progress Centre.
  • iBooks. Text book store. Hands on usage of all related features.

 

Nigel. Teacher.

  • Learning spaces. iPad trolley. Vision tables (flat projection). Idea paint on walls.
  • Showed iPad as chopping board video.
  • Class set in music.
  • Learning. Looking at other schools. Trial. Change perceptions.
  • Students. Enjoyed collaboration with google drive and calendar. Independence to get unstuck through web. Find info in seconds when I want it. No incidents of theft or damage, staff embraced project.
  • BYOD mainly web based research. Parental concerns around device liability. Teachers did not use them regularly. Not as well liked as iPads.
  • Geography stand out subject. More academic progress made compared to control group and Geography used the iPads the most.
  • Giving parents iPad options. iPad mini. Ipad2 and iPad air. Bought for FSM pupils.
  • Change team. Group of staff tasked with making his happen. Help to launch to parents and helping to develop pedagogy across subject areas. SAMR model wheel.
  • Video. Book as new technology.

Tablets 4 Schools 2013 Twitter notes on Storify

I didn’t attend this event. I was lucky enough to receive a personal invite but had already committed myself to another tablet event (much smaller scale) with a company called Jigsaw24 who have some innovative ideas on how to roll out iPad in schools. On the train home I read through the tweets and found Tony Parkin had impartially documented the gist of what was presented. I was going to write up the notes (they’re in my notebook) but time is against me, so here is a storify of the key tweets. All are worth reading from beginning to end, but it is long so I’ll say goodbye here… comments at the bottom should you feel the need!

PS: remember to click *Read next page* link at bottom of storify embed.

 

ICT AUP Review

Possible AUA logo

Possible AUA logo

Summer is here! And so policies get reviewed. Next year my school will introduce two class sets of iPads, a class set of Microsoft Surface Pros and issue an iPod Touch to every teacher in the Junior School. Oh, and BYOD to 220 Sixth Form students with WiFI flooded throughout the site. More about why this combination of gadgets another time, but it’s probably enough to say we are trying on a number of strategies to see which fits best and what works in our context

So, ICT AUP review. Why?

  1. Technology use is changing (has changed!);
  2. Social media has been causing our pastoral team some headaches;
  3. We need to protect our pupils.

What are we aiming for?

  1. A document that can raise awareness of expectations and present a starting point for discussions between teachers and pupils when something goes wrong;
  2. Text that is accessible to all;
  3. To build on the sense of kindness and trust that is part of the fabric of our school.

Where are we now?

Currently we have a five page AUP of which one page is a bullet point checklist. Pupils and parents agree to abide by this policy by the pupil attending school. Pupils do not read the AUP unless they are directed to do so in ICT lessons but these no longer exist.

What do we want to change?

We want to write a policy that is as useful to all participants as possible. There are always going to be infringements and it is how these are handled that we want to make sure is effective. At the heart of the policy is the aim to protect our pupils from the potential dangers of the internet and related technologies. Five pages in inaccessible. It falls into the Terms of Service (TOS) trap whereby everyone agrees because they have to, and very few – it seems to me – feel like they have signed up to anything of, or with, meaning. So, the aim is to achieve something meaningful, simple and useful.

Thoughts and issues

The policy needs to be about people. Not about technology. It needs to help individuals self-check their behaviour, and provide a point of reference for others to use when behaviours have an undesirable consequence. I will run the draft past our very active school council to collate their opinion, as well as the various teacher committees it has to filter through. It will be included in pupil planners; should they sign it? It will be disseminated as part of the registration rota in the ICT rooms, and at staff INSET.

Inspiration

Me old edtechroundup mucker Doug Belshaw wrote this: http://dougbelshaw.com/blog/2009/06/19/acceptable-use-policy-feedback-required/, which is based on this: http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Digital+Citizen+AUA and also refers to this aggregation of resources: http://landmark-project.com/aup20/pmwiki.php?n=Main.AUPGuides. Here is an AUP written by Mark Anderson of Clevedon School which is based partly on the same principles. The latter is interesting because it uses the respect and protect principles, but it is also four pages long which includes an etiquette image and a bullet point checklist. I’m thinking it might be prudent to have something that can be more iconographic (i.e. I can make memorable visual reference via a few icons that serve as a prompt without text). Therefore, is it viable to have a one sheet doc that refers to another more detailed doc? Here is another example of an ICT AUP from down under. It uses protect and respect but it lacks the simplicity of Doug’s adaptation:

1. Respect Yourself
I will show respect for myself through my actions. I will only use appropriate language and images both within the Learning Platform and on the Internet. I will not post inappropriate personal information about my life, experiences or relationships.

2. Protect Yourself
I will ensure that the information I post online will not put me at risk. I will not publish full contact details, a schedule of my activities or inappropriate personal details in public spaces. I will report any aggressive or inappropriate behaviour directed at me. I will not share my password or account details with anyone else.

3. Respect Others
I will show respect to others. I will not use electronic mediums to bully, harass or stalk other people. I will not visit sites that are degrading, pornographic, racist or that the Academy would deem inappropriate. I will not abuse my access privileges and I will not enter other people’s private spaces or work areas.

4. Protect Others
I will protect others by reporting abuse. I will not forward any materials (including emails and images) that the Academy would deem inappropriate.

5. Respect Copyright
I will request permission to use resources and suitably cite all use of websites, books, media etc. I will use and abide by the fair use rules. I will not install software on Academy machines without permission. I will not steal music or other media, and will refrain from distributing these in a manner that violates their licenses.

By signing this agreement, I agree to always act in a manner that is respectful to myself and others, in a way that will represent the Academy in a positive way. I understand that failing to follow the above will lead to appropriate sanctions being carried out.

It’s good but it remains prescriptive. EG: who am I to tell a pupil they cannot ‘steal music or other media’ with their own kit in their own time. School resources must not be used to do so. But in saying that, I’m drawn to another line of thought about swearing on social media sites. If a pupil swears on facebook, and their profile is traceable to the school, then this is akin to swearing at the bus stop in full school uniform on the way home. We have a zero tolerance on such behaviour. We do not trawl pupils activity online but when it does get brought to our attention we need to act to protect that pupil and the school. As I discussed with my esafety-guru mate up north Simon Finch recently, the laws governing esafety are immature and it will be a decade or more before they catch up.

So, what if we do publish a one sheet with reference to a back-up detail document with all the belt and braces on it. The latter is required for legal reasons. Should an exclusion be on the cards, the school is in legal territory and needs to be covered. For me though, this is not the main thrust of what we are trying to achieve. We want to protect participants from each other, from themselves, from strangers and dangers. We need a policy in place that actually helps young people understand these possibilities when they are using technology. Maybe we need two separate documents. An AUA and an AUP. The AUA is the forward facing easy-to-read one sheet and the AUP is the detailed document that is referred to in times of need. This is similar to the school code of conduct. We have a lengthy behaviour policy which is in all the handbooks, but it is based on the code of conduct, which was written by the pupils and teachers and is displayed in every classroom.

This AUP (or AUA and AUP) will be filtered through the school lawyers as part of the review process. It will need approval from the ICT Strategy Committee, the Senior Leadership Team and the governing body. I will publish any drafts I write on this blog. All comments on policy or process are welcome.

 

Another possible AUA logo (source: http://ictevangelist.com/digital-citizenship/)

Another possible AUA logo (source: http://ictevangelist.com/digital-citizenship/)

 

 

ICT Innovator AUPs for teachers

Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bstabler/770416963/sizes/z/in/photostream/

Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bstabler/770416963/sizes/z/in/photostream/

Acceptable Use Policies are a necessary and important document – contract – for teachers in any school because it is imperative that we are protected from the potential danger working online can bring. Following an intense scrutiny of safeguarding and child protection at our school, we published a strict and comprehensive Staff ICT AUP. For example, staff should not connect with any pupil on facebook until one year after they are of school leaving age, and only then with caution as through siblings and friends it can connect you to current pupils.

However, two years on we have included in the new ICT strategy a review of this policy to incorporate a section for innovative teachers who want to employ a new service without seeking formal permission via the various committees in place to oversee the use of ICT.  For example, I have been managing Sixth Form coursework using a project management tool called trello, logged into through pupils and teachers Google Apps for Education accounts. Or, should a teacher want to investigate and explore the use of edmodo in teaching and learning, they need to go about this in a risk-aware and cautious way without their enthusiasm being thwarted by bureaucracy. Equally you do not want to let every teacher engage pupils via services, that facilitate private and untraceable communique, without being aware of the risks involved. The common sense approach is simply not enough in this day and age.

There is extensive discussion of the issues involved and some research collated here on Scott McLeod’s blog, which also demonstrates that this issue is not only a concern for my school. Check out the links on Employee AUPs for material specifically relevant to this area.

We are proposing a clause to the ICT AUP whereby a teacher can sign up to be an ICT innovator and thereafter explore the use of such services with only an email being sent to a designated person. It might be that usernames and passwords, for the accounts being used, need to be shared which will allow monitoring of some sort. This will all be discussed in detail with the school’s child protection officer and the relevant committees. The priority is to enable teachers and pupils to exploit the innovations that specific web services can provide in a protected and safe way that does not impede the momentum of the creative spark that initiates the process. Our core purpose is to empower users who want to use technology to enrich teaching and learning.

If you have any thoughts about this, please do comment. Once the AUP is written, I will share it on a new blogpost.

Digital Textbooks – Yes or No?

Digital textbooks are an interesting beast. Do you use them? My school subscribes to Kerboodle, Doddle, Dynamic-Learning and others.

Today my daughter asked to see if I might borrow copies of a science textbook teachers roll out during lessons that seems to be much better than the issued course book she has. I found out that is available to her electronically via kerboodle. But this was not sufficient: “but that’s no use to me is it?” she quipped when I suggested she already had access to this material. She wanted the paper version. Why?

This is a couple of pages presented in a web browser. On my 13" screen I cannot read them.

This is a couple of pages presented in a web browser. On my 13″ screen I cannot read them.

She wants to be able to use the book on her desk (where her lovely iMac is also located) without using her computer because she wants to be able to *read* it.

So, I opened it to see what I thought. It’s not great. You get the content as above and you can zoom…

zoomed in so I can read the text clearly

zoomed in so I can read the text clearly, but the zooming tool isn’t great

Or change the layout to make it more  appropriate for certain screens:

 

Displays one page at a time defined by page width to screen width

Displays one page at a time defined by page width to screen width – that’s a bit better

Then there are the digital tools that come as part of the book.

Interactive questions:

yes or no questions

yes or no questions

 

mix and match questions

mix and match questions

 

fill in the blanks questions

fill in the blanks questions

Then there’s a glossary:

alphabetically indexed glossary

alphabetically indexed glossary

And you can check the learning outcomes:

learning outcomes

learning outcomes

And you can add your own notes, or take pictures that save to your computer:

sticky notes

sticky notes

Screen Shot 2013-02-22 at 16.50.06

annotations

I think I’ve covered all the major features bar testing it out on a tablet. But are these things really what learners want? Would you want to use them? Is it a matter of learning to use these new resources? Or do they exist just because they can and purse holders buy them because they are cheaper than the hardcopy versions?

To double-check I showed my daughter all these features to see if they make any difference to her opinion of these digital textbooks. It will save me the best part of £60.00 that these three science books cost on amazon. Sadly they did not change her mind – “it’s not a book!”. I missed out a search tool from the features which is quite good, but the keyword *acid* had 78 pages in results and each page takes a flash minute to load. Tried the iPad as well: fail.

no joy on the iPad mini

no joy on the iPad mini

So I search the app store for an app… and found revision apps from same company but no reader app for their digital textbooks.

appless - but making more money through apps for home users priced £0.69 each

appless – but making more money through apps for home users priced £0.69 each

Please fill in this anonymous two question survey – you will be able to see the responses after submitting.

Do you know of a digital textbook that is better than the hardcopy equivalent?